A Gay in the Life

June 14, 2011

It's the most wonderful time of the year! I don't know about you, but gay pride season is something I'd look forward to every summer. I don't know if it's because it coincides with the onset of good weather or because for a few glorious days our major cities are bursting with all kinds of out and proud people celebrating in every way they know how. And with all the great strides we've made this year, we have even more reasons to celebrate. More than anything, though, we're able to see how amazingly diverse our community really is.

That incredible diversity has been captured in a new book from New York City photographer Scott Pasfield. Gay in America beautifully presents intimate photos and contains deeply personal stories from 140 gay American men. Over the course of three years, Pasfield traveled to all 50 states gathering stories and documenting the lives of gay men from all walks of life. This stereotype-shattering collection, introduced by activist Tom Kirdahy and his husband, playwright Terrence McNally, is due out in the Fall, but we've got a video sneak peak which you can check out below.

To pre-order Gay in America click here or visit the fan page here.

Tags: Pride, Photography, America
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Post written by RobHeartsDH (View Author Profile)
About this author: Rob lives in Manhattan with his black pug Riley. When he’s not thinking about daddies, he enjoys writing, eating burritos, watching copious amounts of television, and thinking about his next meal.
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Comments

Very nice for sure. The idea of stereotypes disappeared long ago when meeting various friends from places like Colorado and Maine and Florida. Guys can be quite macho on the outside and acting tough but then they can be real sweeties when the facade can be put away for the night where theres no need to fit into any social gang mindset for the sake of survival during the day. Rural Colorado and Alabama are loaded with charming fellows that sometimes even have a shaved head for appearance sake just to fit into a rural scene.